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Dolphin leaps onto boat, injuring California woman

photo provided by Dirk Frickman shows a dolphin that leaped onto his boat and crashed into his wife, Chrissie FrickmanSANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — A dolphin leaped onto a boat in Southern California, crashing into a woman and breaking both her ankles.

Chrissie Frickman was boating with her husband and two children June 21 when a pod of dolphins swam alongside them. One of the animals jumped on the vessel, knocking Frickman over and landing on her legs.

"The dolphin jumped and we thought it was doing a flip and I guess it miscalculated," said her husband, Dirk Frickman. "It came right onto my wife and flopped in the boat and knocked down and grazed my daughter."

"The dolphin was flopping all over," he said. "It cut its nose and its tail. Blood started splattering everywhere." Frickman pulled his wife free and called authorities as he headed toward an Orange County harbor. While he steered, he splashed water on the 350-pound dolphin to keep it alive. More

 

Pot Legalization Could Bring A Million Jobs to California

free the weed in California An estimated 100,000 people are currently employed in California's marijuana industry, but that number could grow 10-fold within a few years, according to the California Cannabis Industry Association.

There is one big "if," though. That's if California actually gets around to legalizing it next year.

It does seem extremely likely: A well-financed legalization campaign will almost certainly make the ballot next year, and the latest polls have a majority for legalization.

And it will be a presidential election year, spurring the turnout of young people, who tend to be even more supportive of freeing the weed.

If California legalizes it, the industry will be primed for rapid expansion and could generate a million jobs within eight years, said the group's executive director Nate Bradley. More

 

Guinness record set for most surfers riding wave

Sixty-six surfers exalt as they set a Guinness World Record Saturday for most riders on a board. Long-time Huntington Beach surfer Gary Sahagen had a prediction about how the world record attempt to get the most people riding one wave would go down.

“It’s either going to be spectacular, or a spectacle,” Sahagen said, before joining 66 other surfers crammed onto a 42-foot board on the south side of the Huntington Beach Pier.

Turns out, it was a lot of both. An estimated 5,000 people watched from the sand and Huntington Beach pier Saturday morning as Surf City claimed the Guinness World Record for the most people riding a wave on a single board, shattering the previous record set in Queensland, Australia about a decade ago, when 47 surfers rode a wave for 10 seconds. More

 

Tiny Red Crabs Blanket California Beaches

Thousands of tuna crabs were washed up on the shores of Balboa Island in southern California Hundreds of thousands of tiny crabs have been washing up on Southern California beaches, marring the sandy coastline with streaks of red, as warm ocean currents carry them farther north and closer to shore than usual, officials said on Wednesday.

The red tuna crabs have been dying in hordes on beaches from San Diego to Orange County, although some have been washed back out to sea alive.

Such strandings take place periodically and are not necessarily a threat to the species, according to Linsey Sala, collection manager for the Pelagic Invertebrates Collection at the University of California, San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, "This is definitely a warm-water indicator," Sala said.

"Whether it's directly related to El Nino or other oceanographic conditions is not certain." More

 

California love: Water thieves just can’t get enough

In northern areas of the state, counties report illegal diversions from tanks, wells and streams LOS ANGELES — Something rare quickly becomes valuable. So it should come as no surprise that the latest target of thieves in a state suffering a historic drought is water.

California thieves are cutting pipes and taking water from fire hydrants, storage tanks, creeks and rivers to get their hands on several hundred gallons of the precious commodity. They drive in the thick of night with a 1,000-gallon tank on the back of a pickup and go after the liquid gold wherever they can find it. Some have hit the same target twice in one night, filling up their tank, unloading it into storage and returning for a second fill-up.

Counties, mostly in the more rural northern parts of California, are reporting a surge in thefts and illegal diversions of water from wells and streams.

The prime suspects are illegal marijuana farmers desperate for water before the fall harvest, which would explain the surge in water thievery over the summer. More

 

California rent increasing, higher than national average

Cali rents high why is this news? LOS ANGELES -- A not so surprising statistic released in a new report: Californians are paying more for rent than the average American.

According to the report, released by apartmentlist.com, the median rental price of a one-bedroom apartment in California in March was $1,350 -- 43 percent more than the national average. And that number is rising.

"It's pretty brutal," said Ben Bednarz, who is currently looking for an apartment in the Los Angeles area. The report found the median cost of a one-bedroom apartment in California increased by 6.5 percent in the last year.

"I could go to Nebraska and I could just buy a house for $200,000, and a pretty big house probably too, but, you know, then I would have to live in Nebraska," Bednarz said. More

 

Number of whales trapped in fishing gear on California coast spikes

Last October, scientists freed this whale found trapped in fishing gear in Monterey Bay. MOSS LANDING -- A record number of whales are becoming ensnared in fishing gear, including a killer whale that died last week north of Fort Bragg, according to federal data released Tuesday by environmental groups.

Last year, 30 whales were caught in gear, often from crab pots -- double the previous year. And alarmingly, the National Marine Fisheries Service has recorded 25 such incidents already this year, with several Monterey Bay whales becoming wrapped up in ropes and other fishing equipment.

"It's heartbreaking to know so many whales are getting tangled up in fishing gear. They often drown or drag gear around until they're too exhausted to feed. Even more disturbing is that this problem is only getting worse," said Catherine Kilduff, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity, in a statement.

But in an unusual move, crab fishermen -- who were made aware of the issue just last week -- are working with environmentalists on collaborative solutions to the problem. More

 

Suspected marijuana grower fatally shot at wildlife refuge

jackbooted government thugs kill marijuana grower Investigators are all too familiar with the Sacramento County wildlife refuge where a man suspected of illegally growing marijuana was shot dead early Wednesday.

The Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is a popular place for illegal grow operations, officials said, and one of several in the Sacramento area that keeps law enforcement officers coming back almost every year to confront growers and uproot harmful pot plants and toxic chemicals from protected land.

Farmers who grow illegally on public land are usually armed and dangerous, state Department of Justice spokeswoman Michelle Gregory said. Last time law enforcement raided a grow operation in the rural nature preserve near Hood-Franklin Road, it was 2013. Then they found two men carrying shotguns. Both were arrested. More

 

Jerry Brown urges fines of up to $10,000 for water waste in California drought

Gov. Jerry Brown talks about water conservation Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday proposed granting new enforcement powers to local agencies in California’s ongoing drought, including penalties of as much as $10,000 for the most egregious violations of conservation orders.

Brown said he will also propose legislation to speed environmental permitting for local water supply projects, though not – significantly – for dams.

Neither proposal had taken bill form yet Tuesday, and specifics were unclear. The Democratic governor announced the measures after meeting with the mayors of 14 cities in Sacramento.

“We’ve done a lot,” Brown told reporters at the Capitol. “We have a long way to go.” More

 

In Spite Of Severe Drought, California Dumps Billions Of Gallons Of Water To ‘Make The Fish Happy’

no swimming in California as water is mismanaged California is due to run out of water in about a year and has no backup plan for 38 million residents sitting in the middle of land soon that will soon revert back to a desert, according to prominent NASA scientists.

But in the face of this grave situation, liberal, environmental policy insanity still triumps as billions of gallons of water is being released from what little is left in the dams – and it’s not for the humans.

“We’re now in the fourth year of the worst drought in the history of California,” states Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., who is frantically working to end the federal and state policies which prioritizes fish over people ahead of another major water release already scheduled. More

 

The Big Problem With the Latest Plan to Build EV Chargers in California

California EV charger fail One of the biggest obstacles to the widespread adoption of electric vehicles is the lack of on-the-go charging. It’s easy enough to charge at home if you have a garage—not so useful for apartment-dwellers who could benefit the most from EVs—but, unless you have a Tesla and access to the company’s Supercharger network, plugging in on the go is a pain.

That’s why build-out of the EV charging network is so important to the longterm success of the technology. According to PG&E, the utility that provides electricity to 16 million people in northern and central California, that state will need 100,000 public Level 2 chargers in its service territory by 2025, to support the 1.5 million EVs that Governor Jerry Brown wants in the state. More

 

State Senator Bill Monning goes up against Big Soda

fighting big soda with warning labels SACRAMENTO — State Sen. Bill Monning doesn't want to ban Big Gulps, but he announced legislation Thursday to make sure they come with a stern warning.

Monning, a Carmel Democrat who for years pushed for a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages, unveiled a new approach: He wants sodas and other sugary drinks to come with labels rivaling those on cigarettes and alcohol, warning consumers that their drinks are dangerous.

"That is not in dispute. That is science. That is hard evidence," Monning said. "What we seek to do is make that information more present to the consuming public, a consumer 'right to know,' if you will."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, sugar-sweetened beverages are the leading cause of added sugars in the diets among American youth and have been linked to obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular and dental disease. More

 

CHP officer says stealing nude photos from female arrestees 'game' for cops

CHP officers steal nude photos from motorists MARTINEZ -- The California Highway Patrol officer accused of stealing nude photos from a DUI suspect's phone told investigators that he and his fellow officers have been trading such images for years, in a practice that stretches from its Los Angeles office to his own Dublin station, according to court documents obtained by this newspaper Friday.

CHP Officer Sean Harrington, 35, of Martinez, also confessed to stealing explicit photos from the cellphone of a second Contra Costa County DUI suspect in August and forwarding those images to at least two CHP colleagues. The five-year CHP veteran called it a "game" among officers, according to an Oct. 14 search warrant affidavit.

Harrington told investigators he had done the same thing to female arrestees a "half dozen times in the last several years," according to the court records, which included leering text messages between Harrington and his Dublin CHP colleague, Officer Robert Hazelwood. Contra Costa County prosecutors are investigating and say the conduct of the officers -- none of whom has been charged so far -- could compromise any criminal cases in which they are witnesses. CHP Commissioner Joe Farrow said in a statement that his agency too has "active and open investigations" and cited a similar case several years ago in Los Angeles involving a pair of officers. More

 

California Issues 76K Drivers Licenses To Undocumented Immigrants

Applicants wait at the California Department of Motor Vehicles The California Department of Motor Vehicles said it has issued 76,000 driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants since a new state law extending legal driving privileges took effect in January, according to a report by a TV station in the state’s capitol.

California, which has one of the nation’s largest populations of undocumented immigrants at 2.6 million, became the 10th state to allow formerly undocumented immigrants to drive legally. The KCRA-TV report said more than 452,000 undocumented immigrants had applied for a license in January. The numbers reflect ongoing efforts by some federal and state officials to push people who came into the country illegally out of the shadows without the threat of deportation. More

 

Man Scooped up by Garbage Truck Survives Ride

taking out the trash scoops a man A man is lucky to be alive after surviving a ride in the rear of a garbage truck that was on its way to the Yolo County Landfill.

According to Yolo County Sheriff’s Lt. Martin Torres, a man looking for his wallet inside a garbage bin in the North Highlands of Sacramento area got stuck in the Atlas trash truck when it made its pick-up Tuesday afternoon.

Torres said in his 27 years of work he hasn’t heard of similar incidents.

“The man said he was stuck in the truck for about an hour, but estimates show it was more like 3 or 3 1/2 hours,” Torres said. “The truck made several other pick-ups before arriving at the landfill, where the driver saw the man crawl out of his trash pile.” More

 

The Most Important New California Laws of 2015

California has even more new laws New year, new rules.

More than 900 new laws are hitting the books in 2015. Here’s our annual list of the most important and/or interesting, as picked by KQED news, science, health, and politics and government editors. For a more detailed look at health laws, check out KQED’s State of Health blog.

Driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants (AB60) Californians who do not have proper immigration documentation will be eligible to apply for driver’s licenses. The Department of Motor Vehicles expects 1.4 million immigrants to apply in the first few years, and law enforcement, community groups and others are preparing for the surge. More

 

Los Angeles poverty rate greater than California, nation

give California your tired, your poor The new five-year estimates from the American Community Survey show a quarter of all children in Los Angeles County live in poverty. Of those residents who were born in another country, 20 percent live in poverty.

"It’s not like this is new," said Christopher Thornberg with Beacon Economics.

"This is an ongoing situation. As to why, well it’s because of the fact that we are home to many low-skill immigrants, many who are undocumented, people who are, if you will, living on the economic margins of society."

The county's poverty rate is greater than the state, which is at 16 percent, and the nation, at 15 percent. L.A. City Councilman Curren Price represents one of the poorest area of the city. He believes there are a variety of factors that contribute to the poverty rate in Los Angeles County. More

 

Orinda: District says 2nd grader can stay after all

Vivian, 7, is photographed with her favorite Justin Bieber doll in her Orinda, Calif., bedroom ORINDA -- After a torrent of community outrage over its move to investigate the residency claims of a Latina student and then kick her out of second grade, the school district here has reversed course and will allow the girl to stay, the family learned Friday.

Vivian and her mother, Maria, reside on the second floor of an Orinda house owned by the Storch family, who employ Maria as a live-in nanny.

A Bay Area News Group story on Thursday detailed the district's use of a private investigator to develop a case for disqualifying the girl from attending school, provoking a flood of calls, emails and social media posts in support of the family. On Friday, the Orinda Union School District's attorney told Miriam Storch in an email that Vivian could stay -- as long as Storch and her husband become her official caregivers, which they are willing to do. More

 

Charles Manson gets marriage license

80-year-old serial killer Charles Manson CORCORAN, Calif. — Mass murderer Charles Manson plans to marry a 26-year-old woman who left her Midwestern home and spent the past nine years trying to help exonerate him. Afton Elaine Burton, the raven-haired bride-to-be, said she loves the man convicted in the notorious murders of seven people, including pregnant actress Sharon Tate.

No date has been set, but a wedding coordinator has been assigned by the prison to handle the nuptials, and the couple has until early February to get married before they would have to reapply.

The Kings County marriage license was issued Nov. 7 for the 80-year-old Manson and Burton, who lives in Corcoran — the site of the prison — and maintains several websites advocating his innocence. More

 

Pot's Continued Status as a Schedule I Drug Is Now Up to a Calif. Judge

a friend with weed is a friend indeed Although by now Judge Kimberly Mueller of the Eastern District of California has heard all of the expert testimony she will take to make her decision whether cannabis constitutionally belongs in Schedule I of the federal Controlled Substances Act, she will not make her decision until both sides have had an opportunity to argue the question through exhaustive briefs, a process which could take more than two months.

So far, a firm deadline for written arguments has not been set, but Judge Mueller scheduled a “status hearing” to follow up with the parties’ progress for November 19th at 9 am. If the parties haven’t hit any snags by that time, she will probably set a final deadline for briefings on that date.

What she may rule is anyone’s guess. She did a good job of keeping her poker face up throughout the length of the proceedings, and her rulings on evidentiary motions don’t reveal any clear pattern of bias toward one party or another. More

 

California on the Brink: 14 Rural Communities are Now Facing Total Water Depletion

California roasts away Nestled in the mountains of California, is the infamous tourist destination of Bodie. Once a thriving gold mining town, it is now an empty shell of its former self.

As soon as the gold depleted in the early 20th century, the town faced decades of decline that it would never recover from.

By the early 1960?s, the last handful of residents left the town. They leaving behind an eerie scene, filled with crumbling homes and businesses amidst a desolate landscape. However, gold isn’t essential to living. If the Western drought continues on its current course, then we have dozens of ghost towns to look forward to in the near future.

So far the drought in California has been relentless. Where I live in the Bay Area, we’ve had our first rain of the year today, if you could call it that. More like a fine mist. Normally we’ve gotten at least one rainy day by this time of year, but it’s looking like this winter is going to be just as bad as last year. More

 

Cyber breaches put 18.5 million Californians' data at risk in 2013

government orders food to be wasted Cyber intrusions and other data breaches put the personal records of 18.5 million Californians, nearly half the state's population, at risk in 2013, a seven-fold increase over the year before, the state attorney general reported on Tuesday.

The number of data breaches reported by companies and government entities increased 28 percent, from 131 in 2012 to 167 last year, more than half of them, or 53 percent, caused by cyber incursions such as computer hacking and malware, the report said.

The physical loss or theft of laptops and other devices containing unencrypted personal information accounted for 26 percent of the reported breaches last year, while the rest stemmed from unintentional errors and deliberate misuse. More

 

Despite California climate law, carbon emissions may be a shell game

A layer of haze looms west of the Four Corners Generating Station in New Mexico California's pioneering climate-change law has a long reach, but that doesn't mean all its mandates will help stave off global warming.

To meet the requirement that it cut carbon emissions, for example, Southern California Edison recently sold its stake in one of the West's largest coal-fired power plants, located hundreds of miles out of state.

But the Four Corners Generating Station in New Mexico still burns coal — only the power that Edison once delivered to California now goes to a different utility's customers in Arizona. Similar swaps are taking place at coal plants throughout the West, and they underscore the limitations California faces as it tries to confront climate change in the absence of a coherent federal plan. More

 

I Went to California's Post-Apocalyptic Beach Town

miracle in the desert gone wrongThe Salton Sea, California's largest lake by volume, exists entirely by accident.

It was created in the early 1900s after a heavy rain caused the Colorado River to burst through the banks of an irrigation canal, sending millions of gallons of water into a previously dried out lake bed in the California desert.

Initially, the new, giant, inland sea was a blessing. In the 50s and 60s, it was a booming tourist attraction. Marketed as a "miracle in the desert," it became Palm Springs but with beaches. It would regularly attract over half a million visitors annually.

Yacht clubs sprang up on the shores, people flocked to fish and waterski, and stars like the Beach Boys and Sonny Bono would visit to drive speedboats and swim.

Property was so in demand that real estate agents would fly people up in light aircraft and sell them property from the air without ever landing to view it.

But it wouldn't last. The sea quickly became something of an ecological nightmare soup. More

 

School district in California now has a military-grade ARMORED TRUCK just like the ones US soldiers ride to combat in Afghanistan

California  knows how to keep the little bastards in line The second-largest school district in California is raising eyebrows after its police force recently acquired a military-grade armored vehicle.

The San Diego Unified School District now has a 14-ton M-RAP — short for mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle — that American soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan usually ride into combat to protect them against explosives.

The $700,000 tank was donated to the school district under a military program that distributes surplus military equipment to local police agencies.

The federal initiative has come under heavy criticism after police in Ferguson, Missouri, used military weapons usually reserved for trained US Marines against regular citizens protesting the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown, 18. More

 

How Cops and Hackers Could Abuse California’s New Phone Kill-Switch Law

California kill switch law unintended consequences Beginning next year, if you buy a cell phone in California that gets lost or stolen, you’ll have a built-in ability to remotely deactivate the phone under a new “kill switch” feature being mandated by California law—but the feature will make it easier for police and others to disable the phone as well, raising concerns among civil liberties groups about possible abuse.

The law, which takes effect next July, requires all phones sold in California to come pre-equipped with a software “kill switch” that allows owners to essentially render them useless if they’re lost or stolen. Although the law, SB 962, applies only to California, it undoubtedly will affect other states, which often follow the Golden State’s lead. It also seems unlikely phone manufacturers would exclude the feature from phones sold elsewhere. And although the legislation allows users to opt out of the feature after they buy the phone, few likely will do so. More

 

Gov. Jerry Brown to Mexican Illegals: 'You're All Welcome in California'

everyone welcome in California According to the Los Angeles Times, while introducing Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, who said America is "the other Mexico," Brown "spoke about the interwoven histories of Mexico and California." He "nodded to the immigrants in the room, saying it didn't matter if they had permission to be in the United States."

"You're all welcome in California," Brown reportedly said.

Brown has made California a sanctuary state by signing the Trust Act and giving driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. He has also expanded financial aid to illegal immigrants by signing the California DREAM Act. Peña Nieto reportedly "thanked state officials for embracing foreigners, citing measures that extend state benefits to immigrants."

Even during the border crisis, Brown reportedly vowed "to find ways to shorten long waits at the Tijuana-San Diego international border crossing," saying, "If we can put a man on the moon, we can put a man from Mexico to California in 20 minutes." More

 

Too much sex in sex education book, Fremont parents say

California parent don't want TMI sex instruction FREMONT -- A health textbook that talks about masturbation, foreplay and erotic touch, among other sexual education topics, will stay even though some parents are objecting to it on the grounds it's inappropriate for their ninth grade children.

The school board voted 3-2 on June 25 to purchase copies of "Your Health Today" for $204,600 after an extensive review process that included input from teachers and parents, said school board President Lara Calvert-York. It was chosen over six other books under consideration and the district has no plans to pull it from classrooms, she said.

But that approval process the book went through hasn't dulled the fury of parents who say the book's information on sex is way too advanced. A petition on the website Care2 has over 1,500 online signatures calling for the book's removal. More

 

Demand for Groundwater Causing Huge Swaths of Land to Sink

The banks of the Delta-Mendota Canal (shown here on February 25, 2014, in Los Banos, California) were raised 45 years ago in response to subsidence Extensive groundwater pumping is causing a huge swath of central California to sink, in some spots at an alarming rate, the U.S. Geological Survey reports.

With California in the throes of a major drought and demand for groundwater rising, officials and landowners are racing to respond to the process known as subsidence. Some areas of the San Joaquin Valley, the backbone of California's vast agricultural industry, are subsiding at the fastest rates ever measured, said Michelle Sneed, a U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist and lead author of the recent report.

While the bulk of the sinking 1,200-square-mile (3,108-square-kilometer) area in central California is subsiding only about an inch (2.5 centimeters) a year, one 2-square-mile (5-square-kilometer) area Sneed studied is subsiding almost a foot (0.3 meters) annually. At that pace, "lots of infrastructure can't handle such rapid subsidence," Sneed said, including roads, water canals, and pipelines. The drought is likely to exacerbate the situation, as less rain drives more pumping. More

 

California Couple Tries To Conserve Water, Ends Up Facing $500 Fine For Brown Lawn

Michael Korte walks across his lawn in Glendora As California’s severe drought deepens and officials look to reduce water consumption in every possible way, the state appears to be sending mixed signals as to which water-related activity is the most egregious.

The entirety of California is currently experiencing drought conditions and more than 80 percent of the state is classified as an extreme drought. Laura Whitney and her husband, Michael Korte, have been trying to conserve water in their Glendora, California home by cutting back on lawn watering, taking shorter showers, and doing larger loads of laundry. Now, they are facing a fine of up to $500 for not keeping their lawn green.

Survey results from the State Water Resources Control Board found that instead of achieving the 20 percent water reduction sought by Gov. Jerry Brown, water use actually jumped one percent this May, compared to the same period in previous years. As a result, the board voted unanimously this week to impose the first mandatory water restrictions on California residents. The regulations seek to curb water use among urban residents by banning wasteful outdoor watering, such as over-watering lawns, hosing down sidewalks or driveways, and washing cars without a shut-off nozzle on the hose. Violators could face a fine of up to $500. More

 

The Reason California Will Break Apart in the Years Ahead

dividing California A Silicon Valley venture capitalist by the name of Tim Draper, has proposed that perhaps it is time for the various regions of California to part ways.

His goal, is to let California be divided into six different states.

This isn’t exactly a new idea.

There have been proposals to divide the massive state since California achieved statehood.

Of course, none have succeeded. As a matter of fact, there have only been a handful of times in American history, when part of a state has managed to secede to form its own state, and none of them have occurred since the Civil War. More

 

California's Absurd Intervention Over Dorm Room Sex

dorm room sex gets trickier With all the other drama in the news, the likely passage of a California law ostensibly targeting sexual assault on college campuses—approved by the state Senate on May 29 and by the Assembly Judiciary Committee on June 18—has gone largely unnoticed. Yet the bill, SB-967, deserves attention as an alarming example of creeping Big-Sisterism that seeks to legislate "correct" sex. While its reach affects only college students so far, the precedent is a dangerous and potentially far-reaching one.

The bill, sponsored by state Senator Kevin De Leon (D-Los Angeles) and developed in collaboration with student activists, does nothing less than attempt to mandate the proper way to engage in sexual intimacy, at least if you're on a college campus. It requires schools that receive any state funds through student aid to use "affirmative consent" as the standard in evaluating sexual assault complaints in the campus disciplinary system. More

 

California protesters block transport of undocumented immigrants

Demonstrators picketing against the arrival of undocumented migrants who were scheduled to be processed at the Murrieta Border Patrol Station Anti-immigration protesters impeded the arrival of several buses transporting undocumented immigrants into a US Border Patrol station in Murrieta, California on Tuesday, some 60 miles north of San Diego.

The arrival of the group of Central American families had been decried by Murrieta’s mayor, Alan Long, who alleged that the group of immigrants, adults with their children numbering about 140 people, represented a public safety threat to the community.

Assembled protesters, who numbered 150, converged on a street leading up to an access road into the processing center, preventing the two buses from reaching the facility, reported Reuters. More

 

Study finds medical pot farms draining streams dry

pot growers dry up streams SAN FRANCISCO -- Some drought-stricken rivers and streams in Northern California's coastal forests are being polluted and sucked dry by water-guzzling medical marijuana farms, wildlife officials say - an issue that has spurred at least one county to try to outlaw personal grows.

State fish and wildlife officials say much of the marijuana being grown in northern counties under the state's medical pot law is not being used for legal, personal use, but for sale both in California and states where pot is still illegal.

This demand is fueling backyard and larger-scale pot farming, especially in remote Lake, Humboldt and Mendocino counties on the densely forested North Coast, officials said. More

 

Local, federal authorities at odds over holding some immigrant inmates

Local authorities are reconsidering policies regarding requests by Immigration and Customs Enforcement to hold inmates More than a dozen California counties have stopped honoring requests from immigration agents to hold potentially deportable inmates beyond the length of their jail terms, saying the practice may expose local sheriffs to liability.

In recent weeks, officials in counties including Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside and San Bernardino have stopped complying with so-called ICE detainers, citing a federal court ruling in April that found an Oregon county liable for damages after it held an inmate beyond her release date so she could be transferred into Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody.

The California counties are among about 100 municipalities across the country that have stopped the practice since the ruling, according to the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, an advocacy group that is tracking the issue. More

 

DMV Lays Out Rules Governing Self-Driving Car Tests

cars with no drivers are soon being turned loose SACRAMENTO – The Department of Motor Vehicles announced Tuesday it has created rules governing how self-driving or autonomous cars are tested by manufacturers on California roads.

These new rules could open the door for more of these types of vehicles finding their way into local neighborhoods.

The rules cover vehicle testing, insurance, registration and reporting, according to a statement issued by the DMV on Tuesday. Under the rules, manufacturers must provide proof the vehicle being tested was successfully tested under controlled conditions.

And anyone who gets behind the wheel of one of one of these vehicles must first complete a training program. Rules state that while the vehicle is moving, the driver must be in the driver’s seat and be able to take over, if needed. The manufacturer must have a $5 million insurance or surety bond. And any incident involving an accident or an incident where the driverless technology disengages has to be immediately reported to the DMV. More

 

San Francisco Sign Hacked, Warns of "Godzilla Attack"

Godzilla attack threat Someone hacked into an electronic traffic sign on Van Ness Avenue in San Francisco Wednesday, posting alerts that said "Godzilla Attack" and "Turn Back."

Ali Wunderman spotted the signs just after 9 p.m. and took pictures. At first she thought it was a PR campaign for the new Godzilla movie.

Paul Indelicato of Pacific Highway Rentals told SFGate that the digital signs were set up in order to warn drivers about street delays for the Bay to Breakers race on Sunday.

"It kind of fits with the theme," he said. "We kind of smiled at each other when we got the phone call this morning.” More

California's medical prison beset by waste and mismanagement

California medical prison mismanaged FRENCH CAMP, Calif. —California's $840-million medical prison — the largest in the nation — was built to provide care to more than 1,800 inmates.

When fully operational, it was supposed to help the state's prison system emerge from a decade of federal oversight brought on by the persistent neglect and poor medical treatment of inmates.

But since opening in July, the state-of-the-art California Health Care Facility has been beset by waste, mismanagement and miscommunication between the prison and medical staffs.

Prisoner-rights lawyer Rebecca Evenson, touring the facility in January to check on compliance with disabled access laws, said she was shocked by the extent of the problems. More

 

Cali state senator arrested for alleged gun-running was gun-control advocate

California state Sen. Leland Yee California state Sen. Leland Yee (D) was arrested Wednesday at his home in San Francisco and accused of — among many, many other things — offering to procure some seriously illegal weapons. The irony: Yee was one of the driving forces behind some of the toughest gun-control legislation in the country during his tenure in the state Senate.

First, a bit on Yee’s record: The former San Francisco School Board president, who received a PhD in child psychology from the University of Hawaii and was the first Chinese American to serve in the California Senate, wrote legislation in 2012 that would have banned the sales of conversion kits that would allow gun owners to create firearms with detachable magazines or bigger clips.

This year, Yee introduced two more gun-control bills. One, S.B. 108, would have required the Justice Department to study local safe storage ordinances that prevent children from getting access to their parents’ weapons.

Another, S.B. 47, would have expanded California’s ban on assault weapons to include semiautomatics, centerfire rifles or pistols with the ability to accept detachable magazines. More

 

Unvaccinated People Make Up Large Portion Of Measles Cases In California

California health officials say almost half of the 32 Californians known to have contracted measles are in families that chose not to vaccinate Some of the measles cases are linked to international travel.

UC Davis infectious disease expert Dr. Dean Blumberg says measles wouldn’t exist in California without that external exposure.

But as more people choose not to get vaccinated, vulnerability increases.

People most likely to get measles are either too young to be vaccinated, or part of a small percentage of people for whom the vaccine is ineffective.

Measles has been identified in eight California counties so far, mostly located on the coast.

Fourteen of the measles cases reported this year are among unvaccinated adults or kids whose parents received a personal belief exemption. More

 

Don't give up on the bullet train, California

bullet train boondoggle last gasp Who doesn't love a train? Who cannot fail to be seduced by the most appealing vehicle in human history — the rail-induced sensuality of "Brief Encounter," the desperate heroism of engineer Casey Jones, the creative muscle of the Big Four railroad barons, the plucky fortitude of Thomas the Tank Engine and the Little Engine That Could, all wrapped up in gleaming, rocking steel, punctuated by a high, lonesome whistle?

And yet California voters have been expressing morning-after regrets since they voted for Proposition 1A, which promised them a bullet train from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Backers said a Concorde-like fuselage would rocket us to the Bay Area in 21/2 hours and for the low, low fare of $55. A Disneyland ride for grown-ups! And did we mention that it's carbon-friendly? More

 

Marianne Williamson Aims to Save Washington's Soul

Marianne Williamson doesn't like most articles about her Marianne Williamson doesn't like most articles about her. She seems to remember every slight, every snarky subhead that called her a shaman, a prophet, an ex–lounge singer.

"The press creates a caricature," she says. Take, for example, the most recent headline from The New York Times: "Marianne Williamson, New-Age Guru, Seeks Congressional Seat."

" 'New Age guru,' " Williamson scoffs. "First of all, what is the suggestion here, that the 'old age' is working?"

Williamson is sitting on a wooden bench beside her press person, Ileana Wachtel, inside a vegan/organic/raw food café in Santa Monica called Rawvolution. "I've never worn a velvet scarf in my life. You label somebody 'New Age,' and that's automatic mockery: 'She cannot possibly be a serious thinker.' " More

 

California drought: communities at risk of running dry

California is having a dry spell It is a bleak roadmap of the deepening crisis brought on by one of California's worst droughts - a list of 17 communities and water districts that within 100 days could run dry of the state's most precious commodity.

The threatened towns and districts, identified this week by state health officials, are mostly small and in rural areas. They get their water in a variety of ways, from reservoirs to wells to rivers. But, in all cases, a largely rainless winter has left their supplies near empty.

In the Bay Area, Cloverdale and Healdsburg in Sonoma County are among those at risk of running out of water, according to the state. The small Lompico Water District in the Santa Cruz Mountains is also on the list. Others could be added if the dry weather lingers. More

 

Tim Draper proposes splitting California into six states

California could be divided into six states Secessionists in California's rural, northernmost reaches may have found a kindred spirit in the Bay Area.

Tim Draper, the Silicon Valley venture capitalist, is proposing to split California into six states, according to an initiative filing received by the state Friday.

He'd let the northern counties have their state of Jefferson, while adding North California, Central California, Silicon Valley, West California and South California.

Draper did not immediately return a telephone call for comment Friday, and the website Six Californias offers little information about his idea.

The website TechCrunch quoted Draper as saying a divided state would receive improved representation in the U.S. Senate while allowing each new state to "start fresh" with government. More

 

California Begins Confiscating Legally-Purchased Guns

jackboot thugs on the loose in California It is not surprising that the first police raids to take legally-purchased firearms from citizens are in California.

Until recently, the state had the strictest gun control laws and the liberal run state government has always looked unfavorably on the Second Amendment.

Earlier this year, the state legislature expanded the list of what they call “prohibited persons” – people who have legally registered a firearm but, for various reasons, are no longer allowed their Second Amendment rights.

These reasons were expanded to include people who are behind on state taxes, did not pay toll fees in a “timely” manner and a wide range of other minor misdemeanors or reported mental health concerns. More

 

California’s new laws: What changes in 2014

don't frack with California Bills that crossed Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk in 2013 encompassed policy topics from bullets to bike safety. In some cases Brown signed legislation that enshrined key Democratic goals, reflecting the strength of robust Democratic majorities in both houses of the Legislature.

A few of those bills, including one hiking the state minimum wage and one requiring cars to stay at least 3 feet away from bicyclists, won’t take effect for a few months. But that still leaves plenty of substantial measures that become operative state law today. Here’s a look at some highlights.

SB 4 seeks to regulate hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” a gas-harvesting practice that involves blasting a mix of pressurized water and chemicals underground. Rules taking effect at the start of 2014 mandate groundwater monitoring, require neighbors to be notified of new wells and have energy companies publicly disclose the fracking chemicals they use.

AB 1266 allows transgender students to use the school facilities and join school teams aligned with their gender. A referendum challenge could stall or ultimately repeal the law; county registrars are in the process of verifying signatures.

SB 606 brought movie stars Halle Berry and Jennifer Garner to Sacramento, where they testified for a measure barring photographers from aggressively seeking shots of kids. More

 

San Francisco couple pulls off their nude wedding

Gypsy Taub and Jaymz Smith share a kiss as they dance, after their naked marriage A few minutes after noon Thursday, Gypsy Taub stepped through the gilded doors of San Francisco City Hall like any other nervous bride in her gown and veil.

Her intent was to be married naked on the steps and a phalanx of uniformed sheriff's deputies stood to her side like groomsmen.

Right away, Taub noticed a hitch in her plan.

The band was late, and that was her greatest expense. She was not going to start without them so she grabbed a bullhorn and turned the gathering into a political rally for the cause of freedom, while straying into topics of wars, stolen elections and reincarnation.

"The other news for today is that death is not real," she announced, to get the attention of the crowd of about 100 before hammering her main message. "This is a protest against the nudity ban as much as it is a wedding. I know that the people of San Francisco are behind me."

The wedding was the culmination of a yearlong assault on the city's ban on public nudity, as led by Taub, a former stripper turned activist. More

 

It Is Now Illegal To Smoke In Your Own Home In San Rafael, California

a crime in progress In a unanimous decision, members of the San Rafael City Council have approved the strictest type of smoking ordinance in the country. Effective last week, Assembly Bill 746 bans residents of apartments, condos, duplexes, and multi-family houses from smoking cigarettes and “tobacco products” inside their homes.

Introduced by Assembly Member Marc Levine and pushed by the Smoke-Free Marin Coalition for over seven years, the ordinance applies to owners and renters in all buildings that house wall-sharing units for three or more families. The purpose is to prevent second-hand smoke from travelling through doors, windows, floorboards, crawl spaces, or ventilation systems (i.e. any conceivable opening) into neighboring units. More

 

Floating island of rubbish three times size of BRITAIN floating towards California

floating tsunami debris A floating island of debris three times the size of BRITAIN is heading for the California coastline sparking huge environmental concerns.

Five millions tons of rubbish made up of devastated homes, boats, cars and businesses is making its way across the Pacific Ocean following the 2011 tsunami in Japan.

Scientists have already discovered debris on the west coast but their latest findings suggest California is expected to be hit with a deluge all at once. America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released their latest findings showing a huge island of rubbish floating northeast of the Hawaiian Islands.

Boffins have been unable to say for certain when the debris will wash ashore but they have been closely monitoring its movements which stretches from Alaska to the Philippines. Seven months ago, the first documented debris from the tsunami reached Crescent City, California. More

 

California resident: ‘I was all for Obamacare’ until I got the bill

Obamacare bait and switch strikes California California residents are rebelling a bit against Obamacare, with thousands shocked by the sticker price and rethinking their support, saying that what seemed wonderful in principle is not translating so well into reality.

As Pam Kehaly, the president of Anthem Blue Cross in California, reported, she received a letter from one woman who saw her insurance rates rise by 50 percent due to Obamacare.

“She said, ‘I was all for Obamacare until I found out I was paying for it,’ ” Ms. Kehaly said, in the Los Angeles Times.

Several hundred thousand other Californians in coming weeks may be feeling the same pinch, as insurers drop their plans and push them onto exchanges, medical analysts say. More

What’s Going on in California? Third Rare Creature Washes Ashore

oarfish Catalina The third rare creature washed ashore on a California beach on Friday. This time, it was a 13.5 foot long oarfish carcass at Oceanside Harbor.

Sightings of oarfishes are rare because the fish dive more than 3,000 feet deep. Samples are going to be taken to see how the fish died. The oarfish discovery follows a larger, 18-foot long oarfish carcass washing ashore on Santa Catalina Island.

“We’ve never seen a fish this big,” Mark Waddington, senior captain of the Tole Mour, Catalina Island Marine Institute’s sail training ship, told the AP. “The last oarfish we saw was three feet long.”

About 15 people were needed to carry the humongus carcass. More

Appeals court leaves California shark fin ban in place

yummy shark fin soup SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court in San Francisco refused to block a California law Tuesday that bans the possession and sale of shark fins that are detached from shark bodies.

Two Asian-American groups claim the law, which went fully into effect on July 1, discriminates against Chinese Americans because it prevents them from engaging in the traditional cultural practice of eating shark fin soup at ceremonial occasions. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a decision in which U.S. District Judge Phyllis Hamilton of Oakland declined to issue a preliminary injunction suspending the ban.

The appeals court said the two groups "presented no persuasive evidence indicating that the California Legislature's real intent was to discriminate against Chinese Americans rather than to accomplish the law's stated humanitarian, conservationist and health goals." More

E-cigarettes have cities, businesses pondering action

Aaron Flores exhales water vapor from an electronic cigarette Saturday was supposed to be a big day for Billy DePalma.

He envisioned a ribbon cutting and then a steady stream of new customers perusing colorful, pen-shaped electronic cigarettes behind glass cases. They'd gawk at his impressive selection of liquid nicotine — flavors like Hubba Bubba Grape, Gummy Bear and Orange Cream Soda — as he fielded questions about the fast-growing trend of "vaping," so-called because users inhale the vapor produced when the liquid is heated.

Instead, drywall litters the floor of his dark shop. And all he can do is wait. Days before his shop was to open, Seal Beach passed a 45-day moratorium halting any new e-cigarette and smoke shops from opening in the small beach community.

Seal Beach is one of a growing number of California cities now grappling with what to do about the booming storefront businesses. More

In Battle Over Malibu Beaches, an App Unlocks Access

Many homeowners worry that the app will draw crowds of beachgoers to their secluded world MALIBU, Calif. — The battle between Malibu beachfront homeowners and a less privileged public that wants to share the stunning coastline has been fought with padlocks, gates, menacing signs, security guards, lawsuits and bulldozers. There seems little question who is winning: 20 of the 27 miles of Malibu coastline are inaccessible to the public..

Yet this month, the homeowners — including some of the wealthiest and most famous people in the country, but also a hearty colony of surfers, stoners and old-fashioned beach lovers — are confronting what may be the biggest threat to their privacy yet.

The smartphone. More

Court upholds California's foie gras ban

covert foie gras eaters in California SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court ruled Friday that California can keep in place its ban on the sale of foie gras.

In doing so, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals signaled that a lawsuit filed by foie gras producers seeking to invalidate the California law was on its last legs. The appeals court said the producers of the delicacy - the fatty liver of a force-fed goose or duck - "failed to raise a serious question that they are likely to succeed on the merits" of the lawsuit. The producers wanted the appeals court to lift the ban while their lawsuit is under consideration in a Los Angeles federal court.

The three-judge appeals panel rejected the producers' arguments that the ban illegally interferes with commerce and is too vaguely worded, among other claims, indicating the court's doubts about the underlying lawsuit in the process. More

Ex-porn star Sandra Scream's new role: Irvine mom

New life focuses on the metaphysical, not the body The single mother sat down on her couch, taking a rare break. She showed off her child's finger paintings.

"Isn't she quite talented?" Zorena Dombrowski said of the colorful creations of 3-year-old Ashley, who was playing in the park with her nanny - another pristine morning in suburbia.

Dombrowski, her house filled with Disney toys, kiddie furniture and a 100-pound German shepherd named Oskar, reached for a small photo album. The floral cover sharply contrasted with the graphic pictures inside.

"These were taken by the director on the set," Dombrowski said of the Polaroids from the early 1990s, when she was famously known as Sandra Scream — one of the hottest names in the porn biz.

Now, she simply goes by Zorena. More

Sex Worker Says She's Made 'Close To $1 Million' Servicing Young, Rich Guys From Silicon Valley

Pay for poon in California Tech companies in the Bay area such as Facebook and LinkedIn have gone public and made their early employees wealthy. Increasingly, the young, rich employees are spending their fortunes on prostitution.

CNNMoney's Laurie Segall interviewed sex workers in the Bay area, as well as local authorities. All of them said prostitution was on the rise and technology is powering it. It has increased the list of clients, and it's making the prostitution business more efficient.

One sex worker says she uses Square, Jack Dorsey's mobile credit card swiper, to charge clients before visits. "As far as Square knows, it's a consulting business," the woman told Segall.

Another sex worker says she's made "close to $1 million" servicing young, rich men.

Segall says they're from "a number of major tech companies in the area, places where the IPO money has been flowing." More

California man faces 13 years in jail for scribbling anti-bank messages in chalk

chalker gets 13 year jail sentence Jeff Olson, the 40-year-old man who is being prosecuted for scrawling anti-megabank messages on sidewalks in water-soluble chalk last year now faces a 13-year jail sentence. A judge has barred his attorney from mentioning freedom of speech during trial.

According to the San Diego Reader, which reported on Tuesday that a judge had opted to prevent Olson’s attorney from "mentioning the First Amendment, free speech, free expression, public forum, expressive conduct, or political speech during the trial,” Olson must now stand trial for on 13 counts of vandalism.

In addition to possibly spending years in jail, Olson will also be held liable for fines of up to $13,000 over the anti-big-bank slogans that were left using washable children's chalk on a sidewalk outside of three San Diego, California branches of Bank of America, the massive conglomerate that received $45 billion in interest-free loans from the US government in 2008-2009 in a bid to keep it solvent after bad bets went south. More

CHP: Man arrested, cited for highway mule incident

no mules allowed on highway A 65-year-old man was arrested just south of the Butler Bridge on Wednesday after allegedly walking three, fully-packed mules on the fast-lane shoulder of Highway 29, the California Highway Patrol reported.

Wednesday afternoon, authorities responded to reports that a man was walking mules on the northbound shoulder of Highway 29 toward the Butler Bridge, which has no shoulder, the CHP said. When officers arrived, the man allegedly became irate and was arrested on suspicion of resisting arrest, a misdemeanor, and not obeying traffic signs, an infraction.

John Sears was booked into the Napa jail at 3:30 p.m. on the charges, according to the booking report. A city of residence was not listed for the suspect, only California. More

Los Angeles Celebrates Independence Day with Random Bag Inspections

Kalifornia to be made "safe" LOS ANGELES — Over 1,300 law enforcement and homeland security personnel participated in a counter-terrorism drill in downtown Los Angeles.

Operation Independence is a two-day, high-visibility training exercise that is “all about keeping L.A. safe,” according to Nicole Nishida of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

Sheriff’s deputies – accompanied by explosive-sniffing dogs – will have a more visible presence at Union Station to perform random bag inspections, according to Nishida.

Transportation Security Administration personnel were also seen participating in the drill.

Holidays are always a high-profile time for terrorism, but there were no substantiated or credible threats ahead of the Fourth of July holiday. More

Fake Shark Warning Signs Posted in California

Bogus shark warning signs posted Shark Warning signs started popping up at popular beaches in Santa Cruz and Capitola Thursday.

But they are fake, according to state park rangers. It wasn't clear who posted the signs or why.

The bottom of the notice gave a possible clue. It told surfers to "surf Cowells instead."

Cowells is on Santa Cruz's west side; Pleasure Point, where the signs were posted, is on the east side. Apparently in the surfing world, those two surf spots have a long time rivalry. It could also have been an attempt to get the some of the surfers to leave Pleasure Point and head to Cowell.

It didn't work. Surfers breezed past the signs for the morning surf Thursday. More

Rate Shock: In California, Obamacare To Increase Individual Health Insurance Premiums By 64-146%

Obama care death panels eugenics genocide program Last week, the state of California claimed that its version of Obamacare’s health insurance exchange would actually reduce premiums. “These rates are way below the worst-case gloom-and-doom scenarios we have heard,” boasted Peter Lee, executive director of the California exchange. But the data that Lee released tells a different story: Obamacare, in fact, will increase individual-market premiums in California by as much as 146 percent.

One of the most serious flaws with Obamacare is that its blizzard of regulations and mandates drives up the cost of insurance for people who buy it on their own.

This problem will be especially acute when the law’s main provisions kick in on January 1, 2014, leading many to worry about health insurance “rate shock.” More

Cali utility to retire troubled San Onofre nuclear plant

 San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in San Onofre, Calif The troubled San Onofre nuclear power plant on the California coast is closing after an epic 16-month battle over whether the twin reactors could be safely restarted with millions of people living nearby, officials announced Friday.

Operator Southern California Edison said in a statement it will retire the twin reactors because of uncertainty about the future of the plant, which faced a tangle of regulatory hurdles, investigations and mounting political opposition. With the reactors idle, the company has spent more than $500 million on repairs and replacement power.

San Onofre could power 1.4 million homes. California officials have said they would be able to make it through the summer without the plant but warned that wildfires or another disruption in distribution could cause power shortages. More

Amid bolt problems, new Bay Bridge span's opening date still unclear

Bridge engineer Brian Maroney uses a model to explain the broken rod issue on the new span of the Bay Bridge Transportation officials said Wednesday that they need until at least May 29 to decide on possibly delaying the planned September opening of the new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, as they address problems with broken and suspect bolts.

California Transportation Commission Executive Director Andre Boutros told an Oakland meeting of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission that a steel "saddle" had been selected to replace the function of broken bolts made in 2008 and used to secure seismic "shear keys" on the east pier of the suspension span.

The saddle was deemed cheaper, easier to manufacture and less likely to damage the pier than an alternate "collar" design. The fix will involve installation of steel tendons that will be placed under tension and covered with concrete. Boutros estimated costs at $5 million to $10 million. But officials could not commit to the retrofit's completion in time for the planned Labor Day opening. More

 

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